Tag Archives: shell

Piping debug output through grep

Would seem straight-forward, but it gave me a google challenge tonight.

iscsiadm -m node -d 8

Run it.  Well, if you use iscsi, that is. — that was my test tonight.

I was looking for the selective, ‘grepped’ output of:

node.session.err_timeo.lu_reset_timeout

But, when I ran iscsiadm -m node -d 8 | grep timeo.lu — it didn’t give me just those matches.

The man page failed me, so I found a reference to “|&” — so, gave it a go, with success!

# iscsiadm -m node -d 8 |& grep timeo.lu
iscsiadm: updated 'node.session.err_timeo.lu_reset_timeout', '30' => '30'
iscsiadm: updated 'node.session.err_timeo.lu_reset_timeout', '30' => '30'
iscsiadm: updated 'node.session.err_timeo.lu_reset_timeout', '30' => '30'
iscsiadm: updated 'node.session.err_timeo.lu_reset_timeout', '30' => '30'

 

SUNNOVA … why doesn’t NOPASSWD work in /etc/sudoers in Fedora 24?

I’m used to just copy/pasting root & adding in my username, then tacking on NOPASSWD: ALL at the end, like so:

## Allow root to run any commands anywhere
root    ALL=(ALL)       ALL
tbizzle     ALL=(ALL)       NOPASSWD: ALL

Then, running a sudo command, I STILL had to enter the password:

[tbizzle@f24-mac ~]$ sudo date
[sudo] password for tbizzle: 
Tue Jun 28 01:11:55 EDT 2016

CRAP.  That’s not what I wanted.

 

But NOW, it’s different.  The “fix” was to add the entry AFTER wheel for it to work:

[tbizzle@f24-mac ~]$ sudo grep -A4 -B4 bizzle /etc/sudoers | grep -A4 -B4 NOPASS
# %sys ALL = NETWORKING, SOFTWARE, SERVICES, STORAGE, DELEGATING, PROCESSES, LOCATE, DRIVERS

## Allows people in group wheel to run all commands
%wheel  ALL=(ALL)       ALL
tbizzle     ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD: ALL

## Same thing without a password
# %wheel        ALL=(ALL)       NOPASSWD: ALL

and now:

[tbizzle@f24-mac ~]$ sudo date
Tue Jun 28 01:10:26 EDT 2016

 

Hope it helps

cd ../../../ … ugh.

I picked a shortcut, called: aa

Then, in ~/.bashrc (my .bashrc), I created a function:

function aa
{
cd $(for ((i=0 ; i<$1 ;i++)); do printf "../" ; done)
pwd
}

This will allow you to ‘cd’ back X number of directories by issuing: aa X (where X is a number of directories you wanna go backwards).

So … say I’m in /var/www/html/ and I want to go back 2 levels to /var
I could:

$ cd ../../
or:
$ cd /var
or now:
$ aa 2

Example:

[admin@linux1 html]$ pwd
/var/www/html

[admin@linux1 html]$ aa 2
/var

So handy.