Tag Archives: linux

Piping debug output through grep

Would seem straight-forward, but it gave me a google challenge tonight.

iscsiadm -m node -d 8

Run it.  Well, if you use iscsi, that is. — that was my test tonight.

I was looking for the selective, ‘grepped’ output of:

node.session.err_timeo.lu_reset_timeout

But, when I ran iscsiadm -m node -d 8 | grep timeo.lu — it didn’t give me just those matches.

The man page failed me, so I found a reference to “|&” — so, gave it a go, with success!

# iscsiadm -m node -d 8 |& grep timeo.lu
iscsiadm: updated 'node.session.err_timeo.lu_reset_timeout', '30' => '30'
iscsiadm: updated 'node.session.err_timeo.lu_reset_timeout', '30' => '30'
iscsiadm: updated 'node.session.err_timeo.lu_reset_timeout', '30' => '30'
iscsiadm: updated 'node.session.err_timeo.lu_reset_timeout', '30' => '30'

 

git clone config global reset author –what?

Ah, cloning a git repo again, for the first time.   Here’s me using bitbucket.org; it’s free for slackers like me.

OK, so first:

$ mkdir -p ~/git/bitbucketrepo

$ git init ~/git/bitbucketrepo

$ cd ~/git/bitbucketrepo

$ git clone https://full-address-as-seen-in-bitbucket

Cool, now I add a few scripts & am ready to ‘stage’ them with ‘add.’

$ git add .

Unfortunately, this machine will get auto-assigned a name & email based on your login & some FQDN stuff.  I think we should change it.

$ git config --global user.name "Tom's Fedora 24 Workstation"
$ git config --global user.email tomblog@personalemail.email

Now, kick of a commit:

$ git commit -m "testing for blog"
[master 0e08355] testing for blog
 1 file changed, 0 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)
 create mode ....

Now, time to ‘push’ it to bitbucket:

$ git push

AWW Crap, more stuff:

$ git push
warning: push.default is unset; its implicit value has changed in
Git 2.0 from 'matching' to 'simple'. To squelch this message
and maintain the traditional behavior, use:

  git config --global push.default matching

To squelch this message and adopt the new behavior now, use:

  git config --global push.default simple

When push.default is set to 'matching', git will push local branches
to the remote branches that already exist with the same name.

Since Git 2.0, Git defaults to the more conservative 'simple'
behavior, which only pushes the current branch to the corresponding
remote branch that 'git pull' uses to update the current branch.

See 'git help config' and search for 'push.default' for further information.
(the 'simple' mode was introduced in Git 1.7.11. Use the similar mode
'current' instead of 'simple' if you sometimes use older versions of Git)

Then you’re prompted for your password & everything works.

HOWEVER — for the next ‘push’ – let’s adapt for the ‘new behavior:’

$ git config --global push.default simple

Make a test file & test again:

$ echo "BLOG TEST" > new_stuff.txt
$ git add .
$ git commit -m "blog test"
[master xxx] blog test
 1 file changed, 2 insertions(+)
 create mode ....
$ git push
Password for 'https://.....
Counting objects: 5, done.
Delta compression using up to 2 threads.
Compressing objects: 100% (4/4), done.

Looks good!

See you in a year when you need to do it again.

 

SUNNOVA … why doesn’t NOPASSWD work in /etc/sudoers in Fedora 24?

I’m used to just copy/pasting root & adding in my username, then tacking on NOPASSWD: ALL at the end, like so:

## Allow root to run any commands anywhere
root    ALL=(ALL)       ALL
tbizzle     ALL=(ALL)       NOPASSWD: ALL

Then, running a sudo command, I STILL had to enter the password:

[tbizzle@f24-mac ~]$ sudo date
[sudo] password for tbizzle: 
Tue Jun 28 01:11:55 EDT 2016

CRAP.  That’s not what I wanted.

 

But NOW, it’s different.  The “fix” was to add the entry AFTER wheel for it to work:

[tbizzle@f24-mac ~]$ sudo grep -A4 -B4 bizzle /etc/sudoers | grep -A4 -B4 NOPASS
# %sys ALL = NETWORKING, SOFTWARE, SERVICES, STORAGE, DELEGATING, PROCESSES, LOCATE, DRIVERS

## Allows people in group wheel to run all commands
%wheel  ALL=(ALL)       ALL
tbizzle     ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD: ALL

## Same thing without a password
# %wheel        ALL=(ALL)       NOPASSWD: ALL

and now:

[tbizzle@f24-mac ~]$ sudo date
Tue Jun 28 01:10:26 EDT 2016

 

Hope it helps

Repos and Subscriptions needed to install RHEV 3.5

After some fighting, here’s what you have to to ..

Install a RHEL 6 VM

First:
# subscription-manager register
Registering to: subscription.rhn.redhat.com:443/subscription
Username: your new shiny name
Password:
The system has been registered with ID: XXXXXXXX

Then:
# subscription-manager attach
Installed Product Current Status:
Product Name: Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server
Status: Subscribed

(Does the above look familiar?)

 

Once that’s done, go to your RHN account & click on the VM you just ‘attached’ and pick ‘Attach a subscription’ and select your Virtualization Entitlement.

Once that’s done, issue:

subscription-manager repos –enable rhel-6-server-rhevm-3.5-rpms ; sleep 1 ; subscription-manager repos –enable jb-eap-5-for-rhel-6-server-rpms ; sleep 1 ; subscription-manager repos –enable rhel-6-server-supplementary-rpms  ; sleep 1 ; subscription-manager repos –enable jb-eap-6-for-rhel-6-server-rpms; sleep 1 ; subscription-manager repos –enable rhel-6-server-rhevh-rpms

THEN, you can install RHEV & the hypervisor (to get the ISOs):

yum -y install rhevm “rhev-hypervisor*”

Enjoy!

HOWTO: APACHE – permanent redirect to another server & port

I’m using CentOS 7.2 & the corresponding layout as seen here.

So, I have a few VMs that host sites and I elected *not* to move on with AWS due to my very strained budget and it’s using Ubuntu and docker.
That being said, I kept an Ubuntu VM and it can’t share port 80 due to just a single Internet connection inbound and I was forced to make changes.

Here’s what I did to get around it (mind you, none of this is actual):

Take your /etc/httpd/sites-enabled file and make some additions:

# cat blog-toloughlin.conf

ServerName blog.toloughlin.com
ServerAlias blog.toloughlin.com
RedirectPermanent / http://www.blog.toloughlin.com:81
# optionally add an AccessLog directive for
# logging the requests and do some statistics
Next time you visit that domain, it’ll push the traffic back to port 81 (translated by your router).

Caveat: you’ll see :81 in your URL bar and some of your site may not work correctly (things coded to use the domain & no port numbers).

It’s hackey, but it works … fairly well.

HOWTO: MOSH – when you need to SSH and there’s intermittent connectivity problems

Read about is here: https://mosh.mit.edu/

I loaded it up on RHEL 7.2, and here’s the process that I went through …

Add pre-requisite packages:
yum -y install git protobuf-c autoconf automake wget bzip2 gcc-c++ zlib-devel libutempter ncurses-devel openssl-devel net-tools

Run all of these commands:

PREFIX=$HOME
wget http://protobuf.googlecode.com/files/protobuf-2.4.1.tar.bz2
tar -xf protobuf-2.4.1.tar.bz2
cd protobuf-2.4.1
./configure --prefix=$PREFIX
make
make install

export PKG_CONFIG_PATH=$PKG_CONFIG_PATH:/root/lib/pkgconfig

$ git clone https://github.com/mobile-shell/mosh
$ cd mosh
$ ./autogen.sh
$ ./configure
$ make
# make install

echo "export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/root/lib" >> ~/.bashrc ; source ~/.bashrc

firewall-cmd –add-port=60000-61000/udp

HOWTO: Back-up your MariaDB and then restore later?

This is with CentOS 7.2.

Dump the Database you want to backup:
mysqldump mariadb_name -u root > /backup/dir/db_name.$(date +%m%d).sql

Make a tarball with the newly created database dump & the /var/www/html/ directory:
tar czf /backup/dir/wp_site_1_backup_$(date +%m%d).tgz /backup/dir/db_name.$(date +%m%d).sql /var/www/html/site_1

Remove the database dump that was just tar’d up:
<code?rm -f /backup/dir/wp_site_1.$(date +%m%d).sql

In use:

[root@websites ~]# mysqldump mariadb_name -u root > ~/backups/mariadb_name/mariadb_name.$(date +%m%d).sql

[root@websites ~]# tar czf ~/backups/mariadb_name/mariadb_name_full_$(date +%m%d).tgz ~/backups/mariadb_name/mariadb_name.$(date +%m%d).sql /var/www/html/mariadb_name

[root@websites ~]# rm -f ~/backups/mariadb_name/mariadb_name.$(date +%m%d).sql

[root@websites ~]# ll ~/backups/mariadb_name
total 9164
-rw-r–r–. 1 root root 9383639 Feb 7 17:30 mariadb_name_full_0207.tgz

[root@websites ~]# tar tzvf mariadb_name_full_0207.tgz | head -n 3
-rw-r–r– root/root 1211612 2016-02-07 17:30 root/backups/mariadb_name/mariadb_name.0207.sql
drwxr-xr-x apache/wp 0 2016-02-07 13:31 var/www/html/mariadb_name/
drwxr-xr-x apache/wp 0 2016-02-02 12:11 var/www/html/mariadb_name/wp-admin/

To script it, in root’s home directory (or whichever user), create:
.my.cnf ; chmod 600 .my.cnf

In the file, have the following:
[mysqldump]
password=

Need to restore?

[root@websites ~]# mysql -u root -p
Enter password:
Welcome to the MariaDB monitor. Commands end with ; or \g.
Your MariaDB connection id is 65
Server version: 5.5.44-MariaDB MariaDB Server

Copyright (c) 2000, 2015, Oracle, MariaDB Corporation Ab and others.

Type ‘help;’ or ‘\h’ for help. Type ‘\c’ to clear the current input statement.

MariaDB [(none)]> create database databasename;
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)

MariaDB [(none)]> \q
Bye
[root@websites ~]# mysql -u root -p -h localhost mariadb_name < backup_file.sql
Enter password: