Tag Archives: Fedora

git clone config global reset author –what?

Ah, cloning a git repo again, for the first time.   Here’s me using bitbucket.org; it’s free for slackers like me.

OK, so first:

$ mkdir -p ~/git/bitbucketrepo

$ git init ~/git/bitbucketrepo

$ cd ~/git/bitbucketrepo

$ git clone https://full-address-as-seen-in-bitbucket

Cool, now I add a few scripts & am ready to ‘stage’ them with ‘add.’

$ git add .

Unfortunately, this machine will get auto-assigned a name & email based on your login & some FQDN stuff.  I think we should change it.

$ git config --global user.name "Tom's Fedora 24 Workstation"
$ git config --global user.email tomblog@personalemail.email

Now, kick of a commit:

$ git commit -m "testing for blog"
[master 0e08355] testing for blog
 1 file changed, 0 insertions(+), 0 deletions(-)
 create mode ....

Now, time to ‘push’ it to bitbucket:

$ git push

AWW Crap, more stuff:

$ git push
warning: push.default is unset; its implicit value has changed in
Git 2.0 from 'matching' to 'simple'. To squelch this message
and maintain the traditional behavior, use:

  git config --global push.default matching

To squelch this message and adopt the new behavior now, use:

  git config --global push.default simple

When push.default is set to 'matching', git will push local branches
to the remote branches that already exist with the same name.

Since Git 2.0, Git defaults to the more conservative 'simple'
behavior, which only pushes the current branch to the corresponding
remote branch that 'git pull' uses to update the current branch.

See 'git help config' and search for 'push.default' for further information.
(the 'simple' mode was introduced in Git 1.7.11. Use the similar mode
'current' instead of 'simple' if you sometimes use older versions of Git)

Then you’re prompted for your password & everything works.

HOWEVER — for the next ‘push’ – let’s adapt for the ‘new behavior:’

$ git config --global push.default simple

Make a test file & test again:

$ echo "BLOG TEST" > new_stuff.txt
$ git add .
$ git commit -m "blog test"
[master xxx] blog test
 1 file changed, 2 insertions(+)
 create mode ....
$ git push
Password for 'https://.....
Counting objects: 5, done.
Delta compression using up to 2 threads.
Compressing objects: 100% (4/4), done.

Looks good!

See you in a year when you need to do it again.

 

SUNNOVA … why doesn’t NOPASSWD work in /etc/sudoers in Fedora 24?

I’m used to just copy/pasting root & adding in my username, then tacking on NOPASSWD: ALL at the end, like so:

## Allow root to run any commands anywhere
root    ALL=(ALL)       ALL
tbizzle     ALL=(ALL)       NOPASSWD: ALL

Then, running a sudo command, I STILL had to enter the password:

[tbizzle@f24-mac ~]$ sudo date
[sudo] password for tbizzle: 
Tue Jun 28 01:11:55 EDT 2016

CRAP.  That’s not what I wanted.

 

But NOW, it’s different.  The “fix” was to add the entry AFTER wheel for it to work:

[tbizzle@f24-mac ~]$ sudo grep -A4 -B4 bizzle /etc/sudoers | grep -A4 -B4 NOPASS
# %sys ALL = NETWORKING, SOFTWARE, SERVICES, STORAGE, DELEGATING, PROCESSES, LOCATE, DRIVERS

## Allows people in group wheel to run all commands
%wheel  ALL=(ALL)       ALL
tbizzle     ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD: ALL

## Same thing without a password
# %wheel        ALL=(ALL)       NOPASSWD: ALL

and now:

[tbizzle@f24-mac ~]$ sudo date
Tue Jun 28 01:10:26 EDT 2016

 

Hope it helps