Category Archives: WordPress

HOWTO: Linksys – EA9500 / AC5400 & hosting your own Websites

I have an EA9500 Smart Router and when I activated this and turned my ASUS RT-N66U into an Access Point, I found myself unable to access the websites I hosted myself.

Well, for Linksys, there’s an enabled FEATURE, that just so stops this from working properly aka, breaks NAT loopback.

Here’s the symptom.

On the network at home, you can’t get to your website.

Pop over to your phone / LTE – there’s your site.
Continue reading HOWTO: Linksys – EA9500 / AC5400 & hosting your own Websites

HOWTO: APACHE – permanent redirect to another server & port

I’m using CentOS 7.2 & the corresponding layout as seen here.

So, I have a few VMs that host sites and I elected *not* to move on with AWS due to my very strained budget and it’s using Ubuntu and docker.
That being said, I kept an Ubuntu VM and it can’t share port 80 due to just a single Internet connection inbound and I was forced to make changes.

Here’s what I did to get around it (mind you, none of this is actual):

Take your /etc/httpd/sites-enabled file and make some additions:

# cat blog-toloughlin.conf

ServerName blog.toloughlin.com
ServerAlias blog.toloughlin.com
RedirectPermanent / http://www.blog.toloughlin.com:81
# optionally add an AccessLog directive for
# logging the requests and do some statistics
Next time you visit that domain, it’ll push the traffic back to port 81 (translated by your router).

Caveat: you’ll see :81 in your URL bar and some of your site may not work correctly (things coded to use the domain & no port numbers).

It’s hackey, but it works … fairly well.

HOWTO: firewalld – allowing individual host access

So, you’re rolling out a new webserver and want only certain people to take a look at the content? Here’s how you do it.
CentOS 7.2 is the OS being used.

What zone are you in?
[root@blog-test ~]# firewall-cmd --get-default-zone
public

OK, let’s make a new zone:

firewall-cmd --permanent --new-zone=blog
systemctl reload firewalld

Now, let’s add your IP & a friends IP to start testing … given you’re using apache & it’s still on port 80:

firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=blog --add-source=YOUR_IP/32
firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=blog --add-source=FRIENDS_IP/32
firewall-cmd --permanent --zone=blog --add-port=80/tcp

NOTE:  If you are using that port in another zone, remove it from that other zone first, because it can’t be in 2 zones at once.

That’s all there is. Move along now.

 

Need WordPress to send email, but you’re on Comcast?

Sending mail with Comcast as your ISP – this is on CentOS 7.2.

Install:
# yum install cyrus-sasl{,-plain}

Edit /etc/postfix/main.cf and insert the following below the other ‘relayhost’ references:
relayhost = [smtp.comcast.net]:587
smtp_sasl_auth_enable = yes
smtp_sasl_password_maps = hash:/etc/postfix/smtp_password
smtp_sasl_security_options =

Note: smtp_sasl_security_options = … is intentionally blank.

Edit:
/etc/postfix/smtp_password and insert:
[smtp.comcast.net]:587
username@comcast.net:password

Lock down the perms:
# chmod 600 /etc/postfix/smtp_password

Run:
postmap hash:/etc/postfix/smtp_password

Create a localhost-rewrite rule. This must be done, or else the Comcast SMTP server will reject your mail as coming from an invalid domain. Insert the following into:
/etc/postfix/sender_rewrite:
/^([^@]*)@.*$/ $1@<
your_domain_here>.com

Allow SELinux to accept apache’s access to send mail:
# setsebool -P httpd_can_sendmail 1

Restart postfix:
# systemctl restart postfix

Test. If it fails, tail /var/log/maillog!

** NEW INFO **
I had some troubles with this (mail still showing root@localhost in the maillog) – and here were a few more steps, if that doesn’t completely work.

vi /etc/postfix/sender_canonical

… and insert the following, to make “root” appear to be the “wordpressuser” on outbound mail. This should have been rewritten by the rule up above, but it wasn’t doing it.

root wordpressuser@yourdomain.com

Create /etc/postfix/sender_canonical.db file
postmap hash:/etc/postfix/sender_canonical

Add sender_canonical variable to /etc/postfix/main.cf
postconf -e "sender_canonical_maps=hash:/etc/postfix/sender_canonical"

Restart postfix:
# systemctl restart postfix

Do you want to build a WordPress …… (site)?

Welcome.

Here’s a build-out on CentOS 7.2.

Install just the core, then add packages as needed – as you see below:

[root@wordpress-server ~]# yum update -y
[root@wordpress-server ~]# yum install bash-completion -y
[root@wordpress-server ~]# systemctl reboot

[root@wordpress-server ~]# yum install httpd php php-gd mariadb mariadb-server php-mysql rsync wget -y
[root@wordpress-server ~]# systemctl start httpd mariadb
[root@wordpress-server ~]# systemctl enable httpd mariadb

[root@wordpress-server ~]# firewall-cmd –add-service=http
[root@wordpress-server ~]# firewall-cmd –add-service=http –permanent

Set passwords for MySql / MariaDB:

[root@wordpress-server ~]# mysql_secure_installation

Set root password? [Y/n] Y
New password:
Re-enter new password:
Password updated successfully!

Remove anonymous users? [Y/n] Y
… Success!

Disallow root login remotely? [Y/n] n
… skipping.

Remove test database and access to it? [Y/n] Y
– Dropping test database…
… Success!
– Removing privileges on test database…
… Success!

Reload privilege tables now? [Y/n] Y
… Success!

[root@wordpress-server ~]# mysql -u root -p
Enter password:

MariaDB [(none)]> create database wp_site_1;
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.01 sec)

MariaDB [(none)]> create user wordpressadmin@localhost identified by ‘pass_from_above’;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

MariaDB [(none)]> grant all privileges on wp_site_1.* to wordpressadmin@localhost identified by ‘pass_from_above’;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

MariaDB [(none)]> flush privileges;
Query OK, 0 rows affected (0.00 sec)

MariaDB [(none)]> exit
Bye

[root@wordpress-server ~]# groupadd wp

[root@wordpress-server ~]# wget http://wordpress.org/latest.tar.gz

[root@wordpress-server html]# tar zxvf latest.tar.gz

in /var/www/html:
root@wordpress-server html]# mkdir site_1

Copy software to the new directory:
[root@wordpress-server ~]# rsync -aP /root/wordpress/ /var/www/html/site_1/

Fix ownership:
[root@wordpress-server html]# chown -R apache.wp *
drwxr-xr-x. 5 apache wp 4096 Feb 2 12:12 site_1

[root@wordpress-server site_1]# cp wp-config-sample.php wp-config.php

Edit wp-config.php file, then copy to the other site_ directories:
define('DB_NAME', 'wp_site_1');
define('DB_USER', 'wordpressadmin');
define('DB_PASSWORD', 'password_from_mysql_secure_installation');

Again:
[root@wordpress-server html]# chown -R apache.wp *

Edit PHP.INI:
[root@wp-srv-001 html]# vi /etc/php.ini
change the line to this: upload_max_filesize = 25M

Add the following as the last line in /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf:
IncludeOptional sites-enabled/*.conf

in /etc/httpd, make these directories:
[root@wordpress-server httpd]# mkdir sites-available
[root@wordpress-server httpd]# mkdir sites-enabled

in sites-available, make config files for each domain:
[root@wordpress-server sites-available]# ll
total 12
-rw-r--r--. 1 root root 203 Feb 4 23:37 yourdomain.conf

The file should have:

DocumentRoot /var/www/html/site_1
ServerName www.yourdomain.com
ServerAlias yourdomain.com
ErrorLog logs/yourdomain_error.log

 

Create the following symlinks to the .conf files:
ln -s /etc/httpd/sites-available/yourdomain.conf /etc/httpd/sites-enabled/yourdomain.conf

RESTART APACHE!

[root@wordpress-server httpd]# apachectl restart

Go to your domains!

HOWTO: Back-up your MariaDB and then restore later?

This is with CentOS 7.2.

Dump the Database you want to backup:
mysqldump mariadb_name -u root > /backup/dir/db_name.$(date +%m%d).sql

Make a tarball with the newly created database dump & the /var/www/html/ directory:
tar czf /backup/dir/wp_site_1_backup_$(date +%m%d).tgz /backup/dir/db_name.$(date +%m%d).sql /var/www/html/site_1

Remove the database dump that was just tar’d up:
<code?rm -f /backup/dir/wp_site_1.$(date +%m%d).sql

In use:

[root@websites ~]# mysqldump mariadb_name -u root > ~/backups/mariadb_name/mariadb_name.$(date +%m%d).sql

[root@websites ~]# tar czf ~/backups/mariadb_name/mariadb_name_full_$(date +%m%d).tgz ~/backups/mariadb_name/mariadb_name.$(date +%m%d).sql /var/www/html/mariadb_name

[root@websites ~]# rm -f ~/backups/mariadb_name/mariadb_name.$(date +%m%d).sql

[root@websites ~]# ll ~/backups/mariadb_name
total 9164
-rw-r–r–. 1 root root 9383639 Feb 7 17:30 mariadb_name_full_0207.tgz

[root@websites ~]# tar tzvf mariadb_name_full_0207.tgz | head -n 3
-rw-r–r– root/root 1211612 2016-02-07 17:30 root/backups/mariadb_name/mariadb_name.0207.sql
drwxr-xr-x apache/wp 0 2016-02-07 13:31 var/www/html/mariadb_name/
drwxr-xr-x apache/wp 0 2016-02-02 12:11 var/www/html/mariadb_name/wp-admin/

To script it, in root’s home directory (or whichever user), create:
.my.cnf ; chmod 600 .my.cnf

In the file, have the following:
[mysqldump]
password=

Need to restore?

[root@websites ~]# mysql -u root -p
Enter password:
Welcome to the MariaDB monitor. Commands end with ; or \g.
Your MariaDB connection id is 65
Server version: 5.5.44-MariaDB MariaDB Server

Copyright (c) 2000, 2015, Oracle, MariaDB Corporation Ab and others.

Type ‘help;’ or ‘\h’ for help. Type ‘\c’ to clear the current input statement.

MariaDB [(none)]> create database databasename;
Query OK, 1 row affected (0.00 sec)

MariaDB [(none)]> \q
Bye
[root@websites ~]# mysql -u root -p -h localhost mariadb_name < backup_file.sql
Enter password: